Skills for Northern Research Impact

Webinar Training Series

Join ArcticNet and partners every month for a training series: Skills for Northern Research Impact. Open to the ArcticNet network including researchers, students, HQP, partners, these webinars will help you build and practice science communication and knowledge sharing skills to connect with a variety of audiences and end-users. Stay tuned each month for new opportunities!

Upcoming Webinars:

SMARTER, BETTER, STRONGER – ACHIEVING EXCELLENCE IN NORTHERN RESEARCH THROUGH DIVERSITY

The diversity of a team can help drive and shape research questions, methods and perspectives by incorporating new knowledge and ways of doing. Diverse teams tend to be smarter, demonstrate fewer biases and errors, make better decisions and generate research with greater impact.

ArcticNet, in collaboration with Sentinel North, is pleased to welcome speaker Kelly Nolan in a series of webinars that aim at examining current research selection criteria and definitions of excellence through an EDI lens. Through these presentations we hope to show compelling examples of how our systems of process can have unintentional/intentional consequences, and how to overcome these challenges.

In these webinars, the following questions will be explored:

  • How does an individual’s lived experiences intersect with Northern research?
  • What elements contribute to a culturally safe environment in research activities in the North? 
  • What are our personal responsibilities? 
  • How can we contribute to building a safe environment to bring our full identities to work and ensure others feel comfortable too? 

In these webinars you will learn:

  • How you can contribute to a more inclusive work environment and contribute in meaningful ways that lead to improved outcomes and knowledge. 
  • How identities and our sense of inclusion evolve overtime.
  • The impact of white-hetero normative cultural spaces on identity.
  • Novel approaches that have delivered results.
  • Evidence-based resources and our ability to make positive impacts.

About the webinar facilitator. Kelly Nolan is an executive and consultant in business development, external affairs, diversity, inclusion and gender equity, strategic affairs and research advocacy. She is a super-connector and the creator of the compelling male ally, unconscious bias, inclusive management workshops for leaders and their teams.

Please note that although the webinars will be hosted in English, direct translation into French will be made available.

1. Canadian research landscape – Redefining excellence examined through an EDI lens. 

Why is it that we often collectively tend to ignore the evidence that diverse teams produce better research outcomes?  What factors contribute to not implementing this knowledge? 

April 08, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

VIEW RECORDING

2. Identity and belonging – Impacts of identity in achieving inclusion 

Identity, and the impacts of the characteristics of our identity, begin at birth.  As we age, we are taught by our families, our communities and our institutions what parts of our identity are valued and what parts must be hidden in order to feel safe and accepted. Learn how our identity plays a role in how we contribute to teamwork. 

April 22, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

VIEW RECORDING

3. Allyship – The good, the bad, the ugly, where to find evidence-based resources

What are the foundations of being a strong ally? How can allyship go wrong? How can we be sure we are supporting and not causing harm? Together, the group will review best practices. 

May 06, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

VIEW RECORDING

4. Successful EDI case studies – Novel examples that overcome the normal practices and inspire change

So much EDI work is focused on proving inequity exists to those that are privileged.  We will explore some case studies that show meaningful examples of positive change in this space. 

May 20, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

REGISTER HERE

 

BLOGGING YOUR SCIENCE

Interested in blogging about your research but not sure where to start? Join ArcticNet, Science Borealis and Alice Fleerackers in this hands-on workshop that will offer key tips and tricks for communicating your work to online audiences. With a special focus on making arctic science accessible, we’ll take a deep dive into the world of web writing. We’ll cover everything from “science storytelling” to Search Engine Optimization (SEO), outlining essential best practices for each. We’ll also discuss the challenges and opportunities of writing for non-academic audiences, and learn some simple tools and strategies for putting these lessons into practice. Whether you’re an established science communicator or just starting out, you’ll learn why it’s never too soon to mobilize your research knowledge online.

About the webinar facilitator. Alice Fleerackers is an award-winning researcher and writer with bylines in the Globe and Mail, the National Post, and Nautilus, among other outlets. She coordinates the New Science Communicators program for the leading Canadian science blogging network Science Borealis and holds leadership positions within the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada and the Public Communication of Science and Technology Network. With over 10 years of experience as a professional communicator, she has led more than 25 workshops, courses, and lectures on topics such as digital communication and science storytelling. Alice holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Master in Publishing, and is currently pursuing an interdisciplinary PhD in digital health and science communication at Simon Fraser University. Find her on Twitter at @FleerackersA.

Format. This 1-hour webinar will take place over Zoom. It will include a formal presentation (i.e., standard webinar format) along with time to answer questions.

June 3, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

REGISTER HERE

Past Webinars

CANADIAN RESEARCH LANDSCAPE – REDEFINING EXCELLENCE EXAMINED THROUGH AND EDI LENS

 Why is it that we often collectively tend to ignore the evidence that diverse teams produce better research outcomes?  What factors contribute to not implementing this knowledge? 

April 08, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

 

IDENTITY AND BELONGING – IMPACTS OF IDENTITY IN ACHIEVING INCLUSION

Identity, and the impacts of the characteristics of our identity, begin at birth.  As we age, we are taught by our families, our communities and our institutions what parts of our identity are valued and what parts must be hidden in order to feel safe and accepted. Learn how our identity plays a role in how we contribute to teamwork. 

April 22, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

ALLYSHIP – THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UGLY, WHERE TO FIND EVIDENCE-BASED RESOURCES 

What are the foundations of being a strong ally? How can allyship go wrong? How can we be sure we are supporting and not causing harm? Together, the group will review best practices. 

May 06, 2022, 13h00-14h00 EST

 

SIKU – A TOOL FOR COLLABORATION

On March 29, 2022, ArcticNet is co-hosting a webinar in collaboration with the Arctic Eider Society to show the potential for SIKU to support your research collaborations and climate action projects!

SIKU: The Indigenous Knowledge Social Network is a user-friendly web platform and mobile app that supports knowledge exchange and Indigenous-led research and monitoring activities on the land, water and ice. Developed by the Arctic Eider Society in collaboration with Inuit, SIKU is being used by Inuit and Cree across the Canadian Arctic and around Hudson Bay and James Bay.

In this webinar:

  • You will learn how SIKU can be used by northern communities to support collaborations with researchers from institutions in southern Canada.
  • A guest speaker will share their first-hand experience using SIKU in their project.
  • Arctic Eider Society staff will walk you through SIKU’s project management features.
  • You will see the potential for SIKU to support your research collaborations and climate action projects!

Date and time: March 29, 2022, 2:00pm – 4:00pm EST

The webinar will last about 1.5 hours followed by 30 minutes of discussion and Q&A. Everyone is welcome!

Preparation: Please note, this webinar will build on a basic familiarity with SIKU. Before the webinar, we encourage you to create an account on SIKU and spend time navigating through the SIKU Feed and Map. If you live in the north, please feel free to use SIKU to post an observation or trip on the land before the webinar!

Here are some links to help with this:

 

ARCTICKT PORTAL – A DYNAMIC KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER TOOL

February 25, 2022, 12h00 – 13h00 EST

Are you interested in helping to inform adaptation, policy-making, and the sustainable development of the Canadian and circumpolar Arctic through your research discoveries and theories? Would you like to transform your existing and future assessments into living, online, searchable documents that connect you to users, including decision-makers and stakeholders? Are you a decision-maker or stakeholder looking to connect with Arctic experts? This opportunity is for you.

ArcticNet is hosting a webinar that will delve into the nuts and bolts of the Arctic Knowledge Transfer Portal (ArcticKT Portal). Investigators, highly-qualified personnel (HQP), postdoctoral scholars and Ph.D. students from ArcticNet-funded projects as well as partners from across sectors (academia, government, non-governmental organizations, industry) are invited to take part in this webinar to learn more about this dynamic knowledge transfer tool. 

The webinar will last about 30 minutes followed by a Q&A period. This webinar will be recorded for future viewing.

TELLING YOUR SCIENCE STORY WITH THE CONVERSATION CANADA

Session #1: January 28, 2022, 12h30 – 15h00 EST

Session #2: February 4, 2022, 12h30 – 15h00 EST

Have you always wanted to learn how to increase your engagement with the general public and get your research results out there? This workshop is for you if you have new research results or highlights to share and are ready to come with a story to tell.

Thanks to a science communications grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), The Conversation Canada is hosting a science-writing workshop for investigators, highly-qualified personnel (HQP), postdoctoral scholars and Ph.D. students from ArcticNet-funded projects. 

Participants will learn about The Conversation Canada, develop story ideas about their research and get feedback from peers and editors on their story pitch.  The virtual training will consist of two half-days (2.5 hours) of interactive presentations, case studies and hands-on practice, with lots of discussion and built-in breaks. Participants will learn how to build a pitch, structure a story and provide support for their idea when writing for the general public. Participants should come with a story idea (or two) in mind to work on. 

Please note: space is limited. Registration will be capped at 20 participants for the workshops. Participants should be available to attend both sessions. First come, first serve.